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08 2017
Aug
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Can stainless steel rust/corrode?

Stainless steel is much more resistant to rust, corrosion and staining than other alloy steels, but in some circumstances it is susceptible. In normal atmospheric or water based environments like domestic sink units, saucepans, cutlery and work-surfaces, stainless steel will not corrode however in more aggressive conditions, stainless steel needs to be substituted with a more highly alloyed stainless steel. More..

08 2017
Aug
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Common uses of stainless steel

With stainless steel’s resistance to corrosion, its strength, low maintenance and familiar lustre, it is an ideal material for many applications. There are over 150 grades of stainless steel; varying combinations of alloys are added to meet the requirements of industries across the spectrum. More..

08 2017
Aug
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How steel is made

Being strong, cheap and versatile, steel is one of the most widely used metals in the modern world and the second most mass-produced commodity after cement. Steel has built railways, skyscrapers, oil and gas pipelines, bridges, automobiles, ships, cutlery, razors and surgical instruments. From a tiny screw to the Eiffel Tower, steel is everywhere! More..

08 2017
Aug
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Nickel’s role in stainless steel

Nickel was first classified as a chemical element in 1751 by Axel Fredrik Cronstedt. There are about 3,000 nickel-containing alloys in everyday use and about 90% of all new nickel sold goes into alloys, twothirds of which goes into stainless steel. More..

08 2017
Aug
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PVD Stainless Steel

PVD is the abbreviation for Physical Vapour Deposition. It is a process which produces a metal vapour (chromium, titanium, and titanium aluminium) that can be deposited on electrically conductive materials as a thin, highly adhered pure metal or alloy coating. The PVD process In the PVD process, a solid metal such as titanium, is atomised into minute molecules using electricity in a vacuum chamber containing a high purity gas such as argon, nitrogen or oxygen. The metal reacts with the gas and condenses on the sheet material or component suspended in the chamber. Different gas and metal combinations create different colours. Why use PVD coatings? • PVD coating is harder and more corrosion resistant than the coating applied by the electroplating process • PVD coatings do not tarnish or discolour. • They have reasonably high corrosion resistance and doesn't suffer UV radiation so easy. • PVD coatings are more environmentally friendly than traditional coating processes such as painting or electroplating • It gives a low friction film for protection • PVD coating can be used on various materials, including aluminium, iron, porcelain, stainless steel and some types of PVC. Stainless steel is the material most recommended for PVD coating and can result in a wide range of colours, surface patterns and finishes. Stainless steel will normally fade and oxidize over time when exposed to the environment. • Benefits of PVD coating • Once it has been PVD coated, it: • • Will be not so prone to oxidize, tarnish or discolour in harsh sun, humid environments or salt water • Will be impervious to extended UV light exposure with no cracking, flaking or discolouration • • Applications • There is widespread use of PVD coloured stainless steel in the architectural and industrial design industry, such as for stainless steel curtain walls, cladding and profiles on buildings including casinos, hotels, shopping centres, railway stations, airports and high-end retail stores. It is also used for products including fuel injection systems, injection moulding tools and plumbing fixtures.At the smaller end of the scale, PVD coated materials can be used for anything from lighting fixtures, display cases and furniture, to handles, door furniture and taps. The PVD process can also be used on metal jewellery, achieving stunning colours. More..

08 2017
Aug
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What is bright annealed stainless steel?

Bright Annealing (BA) is produced by annealing (heat-treating) steel using a controlled atmosphere furnace. This heat-treatment gives the steel a reflective, mirror-like appearance but it may also result in some imperfections and cloudiness. More..

08 2017
Aug
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What is Galvanizing and why?

What is Galvanizing and why? Without protection, steel rusts due to atmospheric conditions and the degree of rust depends on the environment of the product. Galvanization is the process of applying a protective zinc coating to iron or steel in order to prevent rust and corrosion. The coating effectively becomes part of the steel as the zinc is bonded metallurgically to it. Cleaning Galvanizing can only occur if the steel’s surface is chemically clean. It is essential that it is free from dirt, grease and scale before the process can begin. The common practice is to degrease first then rinse in cold water to avoid contaminating the rest of the process. The steel is then dipped in hydrochloric acid to remove any rust and mill scale. After further rinsing, the components will then commonly undergo a fluxing procedure by dipping in a flux solution. This removes the last traces of oxide and allows the molten zinc to wet the steel. Galvanizing When clean iron or steel is dipped into molten zinc (usually at around 450°C) a series of zinc-iron alloy layers are formed by a metallurgical reaction between it and the zinc. The initial rate of reaction is very rapid and the main thickness of coating is formed during this period. Subsequently, the reaction slows down and the thickness of the coating is not increased significantly even if left in the bath for a longer period of time. The typical immersion time is about four or five minutes but it can be longer for heavy pieces that have high thermal inertia or where the zinc coating needs to penetrate internal spaces. Post Treatment Post galvanizing treatments can include air cooling or quenching in water. Conditions in the galvanizing plant such as air quality, temperature and humidity won’t affect the quality of the galvanized coating but are critically important for good quality painting. A paint or a powder coating can be applied for aesthetic reasons or for additional protection where the environment is extremely aggressive. Chemical coatings and other barrier systems might also be applied to minimise the occurrence of wet storage stain. Galvanizing is a versatile process and products ranging in size from nuts and bolts to long structural sections can be treated this way. It is both economical and environment. More..

08 2017
Aug
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What is grade 201 Stainless steel?

Type 201 is an austenitic chromium-nickel-manganese stainless steel that was originally developed to conserve nickel, as nickel prices were increasing. The nickel is replaced by the addition of manganese and nitrogen. Austenitic steels are those which contain between 16 and 26 percent chromium and up to 35 percent nickel. More..

08 2017
Aug
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What is grade 304 Stainless steel?

Stainless steel grades 304 and 304L are also known as 1.4301 and 1.4307; A2 stainless steel and 18/8 stainless steel. The latter is because it typically contains 18% chromium and 8% nickel. It is the most versatile and widely used grade of stainless steel More..

08 2017
Aug
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What is grade 316 Stainless steel?

Stainless steel 316 and 316L are an austenitic grade, also known as 1.4401 and 1.4404. Grade 316 is second only to 304 in commercial importance and accounts for about 20% of all stainless steel produced. It is often referred to as marine grade steel. More..

08 2017
Aug
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What is grade 430 Stainless steel?

Grade 430 stainless steel is by far the most popular of all straight chromium stainless steels which combines good heat and oxidation resistance up to 1500°F (816°C) and good corrosion resistance with good mechanical properties. More..

08 2017
Aug
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What is stainless steel?

What is stainless steel? Stainless steel is a steel alloy of iron and chromium (minimum 10.5%). It also contains varying amounts of carbon, silicon and manganese to create different grades for different purposes. Other elements such as nickel, titanium, copper and molybdenum may be added for useful properties such as increased corrosion resistance and enhanced formability. More..

08 2017
Aug
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What is the difference between steel & stainless steel?

Used materials in the world. About 1.3 billion tons is produced each year. The boom in India and China has caused a massive increase in the demand for steel in recent years. It is used in architectural fabrications, economic and a lot more. More..

08 2017
Aug
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Hot rolled vs cold rolled steel

Hot rolling steel is a process which involves rolling steel at a high temperature (typically over 1700° F), which is higher than the steel’s recrystallization temperature. When steel is heated above the recrystallization temperature, it can be formed more easily. It can also be made in much larger sizes. Hot rolled steel is generally cheaper than cold rolled steel as it is often manufactured without any delays in the process. Cold rolled steel on the other hand needs to be re-heated. More..

08 2017
Aug
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Kitchen splash backs

Kitchen splash backs provide a dramatic visual effect to your kitchen while protecting it from cooking mess. Using stainless steel sheets to make a backsplash can be cheaper than tiling and much easier to install. Unlike ceramic or stone tiles, metal is non porous. More..